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(Photo: Drunk Elephant)
Drunk Elephant
(Photo: Drunk Elephant)

Aside from a Josie Maran argan oil here and a Tata Harper cleanser there, it’s still really difficult to shop for safe skin-care products at Sephora, the go-to beauty shop for many women. (Target, it seems, is doing a better job stocking natural-leaning brands.)

And the latest non-toxic line to woo the mega retailer is one you may not have heard of: Drunk Elephant, a new, cheekily-named brand with a clinical-meets-natural concept.

Five of the brand’s core products—a Virgin Marula Luxury face oil, glycolic and vitamin C serums, and two cleansing bars—went live on Sephora.com on January 13 and will hit select store shelves later this year.

Founder Tiffany Masterson says the brand is doing things differently by using a combination of natural and safe synthetic ingredients that are high-quality (unrefined marula oil instead of refined, for instance), and eliminating unnecessary, harmful ones that don’t do a thing for the skin, like fragrance.

“We’re paying a lot of money for these great ingredients. Why would we put something in there to color or scent it that doesn’t help our skin but can wreak havoc [on it] and interfere with the expensive ingredients doing their job?” she says.

This means you won’t find chemicals like parabens or pthalates on the ingredient lists, or natural brand standbys essential oils, which Masterson says can be irritating.

It also means the products are an investment, with facial bar soaps at $28, and the serums at $80 and $90. But unlike Tata Harper’s luxe feel, the plastic, colorful packaging (and name, which alludes to how elephants in the wild get “drunk” on marula oil) has more of a young, fun vibe. “It’s a seriously formatted line, but the packaging is a little more playful,” Masterson says. —Lisa Elaine Held

For more information, visit www.drunkelephant.com or www.sephora.com

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