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Sugar is literally keeping you up at night, a new study shows


sleep_sugarYou’ve told us before: You’re not sleeping as much as you want to be. Maybe you’ve tried counting breaths or yoga—but you might take a look at your food diary to see what’s keeping you from the zzz’s of your dreams.

According to a new study at Columbia University Medical Center’s Institute of Human Nutrition, participants who ate meals that were high in protein and low in saturated fat fell asleep fastest. And the more fiber they ate, the more time they were likely to spend in a deep sleep. (Fiber, by the way, is a gut health secret weapon as well.)

On the other side of things, bad sleep—AKA lighter, less restorative, and more disrupted—was associated with a diet low in fiber and high in sugar and saturated fat.

So the next time you need a solid snooze (um, always), make your bedtime snack broccoli and beans rather than chips and dip with a handful of chocolate chips. —Alison Feller

And to make your bedroom a sleep-boosting sanctuary, Candice Kumai has a few tips to share …

(Photo: Stocksnap.io)