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Alicia Silverstone The Kind Diet
Silverstone's "Kind Diet" may be unkind to you

“There are so many fad diets out there,” says certified health coach Brandi Molitor. “And none of them take a person’s age, gender, ethnicity, blood type, or metabolism into consideration.”

Enter bio-individuality, a thought-provoking yet painfully obvious theory that’s finally getting its due. At its core, bio-individuality recognizes that one person’s nourishing food is another person’s poison. The theory, first put forth by Roger Williams in his 1956 book Biochemical Individuality, is only now garnering broad attention after being embraced by forward-looking, holistic-leaning institutions like the Institute for Integrative Nutrition.

Brandi Molitor, 31, recommends throwing away your copy of Skinny Bitch

So while Alicia Silverstone proselytizes a vegan diet as a panacea for all health problems (“Your skin will clear! Pounds will melt away! Your energy will improve!”), Molitor and other bio-individuality proponents take a more circumspect approach. “Veganism is great for the environment; I understand where Alicia is coming from in terms of the meat industry and factory farming,” says Molitor who was a vegan for over a decade until metabolic testing revealed that she need a lot of protein.

“Just eating soy and tempeh always made me feel a little down. After understanding that my body reacts better to animal protein, I ate organic chicken and had the most amazing reaction—I felt full, happy, and my muscle tone improved.” People with Type A blood types, however, often really flourish on a vegan diet, explains Molitor, “it just comes down to using your own body as a laboratory and figuring out what works for you.”

You can also go about it a bit more scientifically, by seeing a nutrition coach like Molitor and analyzing your ancestry, blood type, and metabolic function. “Chances are if you come from Dutch, English, or Russian stock, being a vegetarian will be a really tough road for you,” say Molitor. Eating a healthier-version of our your ancestor’s diet is often the perfect recipe.

Brandi Molitor Wellness Coaching, 917-446-3631, www.brandimolitor.com