Makeup Tips

The Most Popular Makeup Wipes on Amazon Just Got an Exciting Eco-Friendly Upgrade

Photo: Getty Images / Adene Sanchez
There are a few makeup products that you’re guaranteed to find in any beauty aficionado’s cabinet—a perfectly-matched foundation, an easy-to-apply black eyeliner, a wear-anywhere neutral lipstick, and of course, a tried-and-tested makeup remover to get all of it off at the end of the night. For decades, Neutrogena's Makeup Remover Cleansing Wipes ($10) have been touted as the GOAT for whisking away even the most stubborn formulas, beloved by celebrities and Amazon shoppers alike (fun fact, they're one of Amazon's best-selling beauty products, and have more than 75,000 five-star reviews). But while these wipes undoubtedly get the job done, they traditionally haven't been sustainable (they're single-use, after all), which is why we were endlessly excited to discover that they recently received an eco-friendly update.

Last month, the brand relaunched its fan-favorite makeup-removing wipes, this time in compostable form. The new wipes are made from100-percent plant-based fibers, and are designed to biodegrade in 35 days. Of course, in order for this shift to actually make any sort of sustainable difference, it's on consumers to compost their wipes instead of simply tossing them in the trash. But if you've never composted at home before, no biggie—it's honestly far easier than you might expect. Take a peek at this beginner’s guide to help you get started.

As far as the formula goes, the compostable wipes are near-identical to their predecessors, and offer a lot of power in a few easy swipes. The emulsifying ingredients in the towelettes work to remove any dirt, grime, and makeup from the surface of your skin while also clearing away debris from within your pores. What makes them even better than the originals, though, is that they also include micellar water technology to give you an even deeper clean and added hydration.

As effective as Neutrogena's cleansing wipes are, it's worth noting that they shouldn't be used in place of your regular face-washing routine. They're great for removing makeup before you go in with your actual cleanser, but should really only be used on their own in a pinch (like after the gym, or on nights when you just can't deal with doing an entire skin-care regimen).

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