Food and Nutrition

5 Foods With Vitamin D To Eat Now That You’re Spending More Time Indoors

Kells McPhillips

Photo: Unsplash/Alison Marras

Before COVID-19, Americans spent an average of only eight percent of their time in the great outdoors. Now that many folks find themselves under quarantine orders and working up to three more hours per day, we’re likely spending even less time soaking up the sunshine. That’s why right now (and always), you’re going to want to look for vitamin D in the food you eat.

Vitamin D is a busy-body of a vitamin that helps many of your systems work efficiently. “Vitamin D plays a vital role in regulating the absorption of calcium and phosphorous, which is essential for the growth and development of bones and teeth. It may reduce the risk for type two diabetes through its role in increasing insulin sensitivity, boost beta cell functioning in the pancreas, and even lessen inflammation,” says Tracy Lockwood Beckerman, RD, host of Well+Good’s YouTube series You Versus Food. Researchers also believe that consuming an adequate amount of the vitamin may stave off seasonal depression and anxiety.

While dietitians like Beckerman recommend eating about 600 IU (or international units) of vitamin D per day, most people fall way short of hitting that target. So that calls for a nice 15-minute walk in the sun and/or a plate full of vitamin D-rich foods. Below, you’ll learn about five sources of the sunshine vitamin. (I challenge you to fit at least three of them into one meal.)

Food rich in vitamin D

1. Egg yolks

One large egg yolks contains about 10 percent of your daily value of vitamin D, says Beckerman. If you ask me, that’s reason enough to make a three-egg omelet to hit 30 percent of your daily intake (and sprinkle in a few more of the ingredients you’re about to learn about).

All your FAQs about eggs, answered:

2. Sockeye salmon

Dietitians agree: Salmon is the superfish of the sea. (See what I did there?) Beckerman says that three ounces of Sockeye salmon provides 71 percent of your daily intake. Serve yourself a portion for dinner and you’ll hit your vitamin D intake before dessert.

3. Tuna

Tuna is another sea-sourced food with plenty of vitamin D. One 3.5 ounce serving of the fish provides 34 percent of those IUs you need for the day. Whether you reach for a tuna salad sandwich or just top of your lunch salad with a spoonful of the canned stuff, commend yourself for doing your vitamin D stores a solid.

4. Mushrooms

One of the richest plant-based sources of vitamin D, a generous cup of white mushroom offers 46 percent of your daily value. Mushrooms fit effortlessly into all manner of dishes from pizza to stir-fry to soups. If you weren’t buying the white button vegetable every week already, consider this your invitation to make it a staple.

Make those ‘shrooms into plant-based bolognese:

5. 2% milk

I mean, of course milk is on this list! Sip one cup of 2-percent milk and you’ve earned 15 percent of your daily value of vitamin D. Grab a bowl, grab your cereal—it’s going down.

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