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How to maintain a healthy relationship with exercise


You want to get enough, but you don't want to go overboard. Here are 9 habits of people who have healthy relationships with fitness.
(Photo: weheartit)
(Photo: weheartit)

via Huffington Post

HuffingtonPostMuch like the precarious line between thinking carefully about food and obsessing over it, exercise is also a highly beneficial component of a healthy lifestyle that can easily become problematic.

Especially among people with a history of eating disorders, a healthy relationship to exercise is “just as pertinent as having a healthy relationship with food,” says Marjorie Nolan Cohn, RD, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and an American College of Sports Medicine certified Health Fitness Specialist. These days, we hear almost as much about the health risks of excessive exercise as we do lack of physical activity.

“One end of it is avoidance of exercise, versus the other extreme extreme, which is too much exercise,” says Jennifer E. Carter, Ph.D., the director of sport psychology and the Ohio State University Sports Medicine Center. “Balanced exercise finds the middle ground.”

Some of us need an extra push to get off the couch, or some reigning in once in a while. For others, finding the balance between too much and too little physical activity comes easily. Below are a few things these people do differently.

Keep reading to see 9 habits of people who have a healthy relationship with exercise…

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