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YogaWorks opens its first outer-borough studio


YogaWorks
(Photo: Facebook/YogaWorks Brooklyn)

Mega yoga studio brand YogaWorks headed to New York’s outer boroughs for the first time last week, with the opening of a new location in Brooklyn Heights. And the studio, just steps from the Borough Hall/Jay Street-Metrotech subway convergence, is playing up its new home—with a slightly more industrial design feel and a giant Brooklyn Bridge arch filling the wall above the main staircase.

YogaWorks Brooklyn is the company’s 28th studio nationwide and the sixth to open in the New York region. Its other Big Apple studios are all in Manhattan, plus one in Westchester, and it celebrated its last opening a five full years ago, with the debut of its high-design Soho studio.

In Brooklyn, you’ll find lofty ceilings with exposed pipes and hanging light fixtures throughout the two-story space. The top floor houses check-in and retail, while a basement floor is where the action is.

That includes a huge open area for lounging, with lockers, benches, and mat storage and men’s and women’s locker rooms, which are small and a little cramped (showers are still under construction).

There are two large studios, one for just yoga classes and another equipped with a rope wall that circles the entire room. And the rope wall does double duty for TRX clip-in, since in addition to yoga, you’ll find TRX, barre, and Pilates classes on the schedule.

Which, by the way, is already packed with about a dozen classes every day and includes some well-known New York teachers like Manhattan YogaWorks and Kula’s Aarona Pichinson and Jennifer Guarnieri, also from Kula, and Equinox.

I took a slow, thoughtful vinyasa class that came with careful cues and happy-making energy, and I was surprised to find that it was the most diverse yoga class I’ve been to in years, in terms of race and ages represented. Maybe reaching a larger community will be another benefit of heading to the boroughs? —Lisa Elaine Held

For more information, visit www.yogaworks.com