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A St. Patrick’s Day cabbage makeover [recipe]


Opposed to the St. Patrick's Day staple of over-cooked cabbage and corned beef, we honor the uber-nutrients of this veggie by not cooking the heck out of it.
superfood cabbage
The way cabbage ought to look—green, not gray (Photo and recipe: Jennifer Kass)

Even though it’s routinely snubbed as a pedestrian food, there’s nothing ordinary about cabbage.

Case in point: cabbage is a cancer-fighting cruciferous vegetable loaded with anti-aging antioxidants, glucosinolates (which are anti-inflammatories), and has cholesterol-lowering benefits—just a taste of the benefits according to The World’s Healthiest Foods.

An added perk: cabbage is a top detox vegetable. It has fat-burning powers (high fiber) and substantial amounts of iron and sulphur, minerals that work as cleansing agents for the digestive system.

So it’s a great veggie to add to your spring diet, particularly if your winter featured extra helpings of comfort food.

Try this deliciously simple cabbage recipe with an Asian-inspired twist. Ginger gives it an additional cleansing boost. Stir-frying the cabbage allows it to retain its nutrients—a stark contrast to the St. Patrick’s Day staple of the over-cooked cabbage and corned beef.

Recipe: Ginger Sesame Cabbage Stir-fry

One head of green cabbage
1 Tbsp toasted sesame oil
1 Tbsp freshly grated ginger root
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium yellow onion, diced
sea salt and fresh black pepper to taste
Gomasio to sprinkle on top

Cut cabbage in half lengthwise and remove the tough core, chopping the rest into 1-inch ribbons. Heat sesame oil on medium heat and add chopped onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Stir for a couple minutes. Add ginger, cabbage, and a splash of water and cover for 5 minutes. Serve immediately and top with Gomasio (a versatile sea salt and sesame seed duo you can pick up at Whole Foods). —Jennifer Kass

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