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A new exhibition in London focuses on the power of positivity


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Photo: Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee in ‘Am I Making Sense’ exhibition
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For many people, the small act of practicing daily affirmations can be more life-altering than a tangible or physical choice to spark change—like, say, cutting out soy or dairy from your diet or doing a tough daily workout. And at least a few creative pioneers agree: For a one-day-only exhibition tomorrow in London at Hoxton Arches, several artists were tasked with picking an affirmation to explore as means of reflecting on their identity, perspective, and lived experiences.

“I was drawn to working with each artist because while their output, aesthetics, and execution are different, their works are centered by identity.” —Ashleigh Kane, exhibition curator

“Am I Making Sense,” curated by Ashleigh Kane, arts and culture editor at Dazed, told newly formed Melissa Collective she chose each artist in the group exhibition “because while their output, aesthetics, and execution are different, their works are centered by identity. Each fearlessly embraces alternative perspectives informed by their diverse experiences and desires to push representation forward.”

As Dazed reports, artist Ruth Ossai chose the affirmation “I am enough.” She collaborated with stylist Ibrahim Kamara to create a meditative piece that tackles the perceived rigidities of her Nigerian-British background. Writer Shon Faye worked with director Bec Evans to examine the affirmation “My presence is a victory” through a short film about a two-year experience with depression. Finally is Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee‘s pick (and the headiest yet): “My voice will not be silent nor will it just be heard—it will be seen, lived, and experienced.” Lee’s contribution to the exhibition will be an immersive walk-through with a Japanese-inspired set created by Clarissa Livock.

The artists picked affirmations that essentially counteract some of the most negative things they’ve heard, experienced, or been subjected to, as a means for self-empowerment and self-love.

If you’re not in London get inspired by the images below, and remember the time is always right now when it comes to self care and loving who you are.

Preview the exhibition below.

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Photo: Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee in “Am I Making Sense” exhibition

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Photo: Ruth Ossai in “Am I Making Sense” exhibition

Need a little inspiration for picking a mantra? Here are 12 that wellness it-girls swear by and how Well+Good council members incorporate it into their gratitude practices

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