You May Also Like

The Paleo muffin recipe Emmy Rossum makes

Emmy Rossum sweetens her Paleo-friendly muffins with 2 extra-healthy secret ingredients

Natural birth control app gets FDA approval

This app might help you get off the pill once and for all

britney spears yoga

The simple yoga moves Britney Spears uses to combat travel exhaustion

Starbucks drink

Starbucks is dropping protein-packed coffees, but are they actually healthy?

Pelvic floor muscle exercises by Hilaria Baldwin

Hilaria Baldwin says this lower abs move improves sex, bladder control, and *more*

Karamo Brown on how to tell if someone likes you

Why Karamo Brown thinks *this* old-school crush advice deserves a failing grade

Warning: Sunscreen pills don’t work, the FDA says


Thumbnail for Warning: Sunscreen pills don’t work, the FDA says
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Lyuba Burakova

As nice as it would be to pop a pill that strengthens your skin and protects it from dangerous UV rays just as effectively as sunscreen, the reality is, they just don’t work, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—and the federal agency is going after the companies that are trying to convince people otherwise.

In a new press release, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, confronts the new trend, saying the companies that are illegally selling products have been sent warning letters and must correct all violations—particularly the claims that their pills can protect people from the sun.

“There’s no pill or capsule that can replace your sunscreen,” Dr. Gottlieb says. “These companies are putting people’s health at risk by giving consumers a false sense of security that a dietary supplement could prevent sunburn, reduce early skin aging caused by the sun, or protect from the risks of skin cancer.”

“There’s no pill or capsule that can replace your sunscreen.” —Scott Gottlieb, MD

Right now, the products in question—including GliSODin Skin Nutrients’ Advanced Skin Brightening Formula, Napa Valley Bioscience’s Sunsafe Rx, Pharmacy Direct’s Solaricare and Sunergized LLC’s Sunergetic—will be going through some rebranding to prevent any possibility that consumers are misled about their sun protection. And, it’s honestly easy to be fooled: The first product in particular isn’t sold on some sketchy website—you can get it from trusted online retailers, where it promises to “enhance photo-protection” and “strengthen your skin’s defenses against ultraviolet radiation.” Someone even left a review that it was prescribed by their dermatologist because they “have high sun exposure.”

Currently, the companies have been instructed to “take prompt action” to resolve the issues—and in the meantime, hopefully anyone who already has a bottle at home and is using it as a sunscreen alternative tosses it out ASAP.

Here’s why your sunscreen might be staining your clothes—and how to prevent it. Or, find out why you should wear sunscreen on daytime flights.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

best face sunscreens

These are the 9 best sunscreens for your face (no chalky streaks in sight)

burnout at work for women

Can you actually get ahead at work these days without risking burnout?

Natural birth control app gets FDA approval

This app might help you get off the pill once and for all

Karamo Brown on how to tell if someone likes you

Why Karamo Brown thinks *this* old-school crush advice deserves a failing grade

Starbucks drink

Starbucks is dropping protein-packed coffees, but are they actually healthy?

Pelvic floor muscle exercises by Hilaria Baldwin

Hilaria Baldwin says this lower abs move improves sex, bladder control, and *more*