You May Also Like

cbd drink

How to make a super simple CBD drink

Chopped romaine lettuce hosts e. coli outbreak

Everything you need to know about the E. coli outbreak on romaine lettuce

The beginner's guide to composting

The beginner’s guide to composting—no matter the size of your space

Why obesogens make it hard to lose weight

Why is long-term weight loss so hard? These scary chemicals are partly to blame

Chef Gordon Ramsay tweets plans to go vegan

Meat-loving chef Gordon Ramsay announces he’s going vegan—for at least one meal

cauliflower grilled cheese

This cauliflower crust grilled cheese is next-level comfort food

Should you really be relying on coffee to stay regular?


Thumbnail for Should you really be relying on coffee to stay regular?
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Rob Cros

Coffee is the secret to a productive morning in more ways than one. If it’s part of your daily ritual, then you know that it stimulates every part of your body—from your brain to your, um, intestinal tract.

No, it’s not just you: One of the less often-discussed perks of an a.m. cup of joe is that it can help facilitate regular bowel movements, for reasons that scientists don’t fully understand. In fact, many drink coffee simply for that reason. But is it really a safe and efficient way to get things moving?

According to Kristin Kirkpatrick—MS, RDN, and manager of wellness nutrition services at Cleveland Clinic—drinking coffee in moderation isn’t likely to hurt you, and as long as you’re 18 or older, it’s a healthy way to help yourself stay regular. That said, everyone metabolizes caffeine differently and it’s important to know your threshold. “Fast metabolizers clear caffeine quickly from their systems, while slow metabolizers keep caffeine in their system longer, making themselves more at risk for high blood pressure and heart attack,” she says.

It’s also important to investigate the root cause of your sluggish number twos. “A healthy individual with a normal digestive system should not have frequent bouts of constipation,” says Kirkpatrick. If your bowels simply won’t budge without a sip of coffee, it might mean that you’re not drinking enough water—you should aim to drink two liters a day.

Your eating habits may also be the culprit. “[Constipation] may indicate a poor diet filled with processed foods and sugar—and perhaps even too little food,” says Kirkpatrick. To get in more fiber, she recommends eating whole grains, beans and legumes, fruits, and vegetables throughout the day. “I also suggest including fermented foods or probiotic supplements in the diet to promote good gut health,” she adds.

And if you’re doing all of the above and still feel stuck, try a good run or workout class. “Movement is the key to longevity,” Kirkpatrick proclaims—in life, that is, not time spent in the bathroom.

These magnesium-packed brownies are another particularly delish cure for digestion that’s dragging. And here’s what to do if constipation hits while you’re traveling

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Chopped romaine lettuce hosts e. coli outbreak

Everything you need to know about the E. coli outbreak on romaine lettuce

anthony bourdain talks vegan burgers

Why Anthony Bourdain isn’t sold on the Impossible Burger

These are the supplements all vegans should take

These are the supplements every vegan should take, according to experts

The Goods Mart convenience store

This better-for-you convenience store serves up healthy versions of pit-stop faves

Chef Gordon Ramsay tweets plans to go vegan

Meat-loving chef Gordon Ramsay announces he’s going vegan—for at least one meal

Why obesogens make it hard to lose weight

Why is long-term weight loss so hard? These scary chemicals are partly to blame