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Teachers aren’t just skilled at providing kids with the tools to become strong and passionate #bossbabes; they’re also total masters at avoiding any sort of sickness, fighting off germs with ninja-like strength. But how do they do it when their classrooms essentially double as breeding grounds for bacteria?

While there are plenty of methods for avoiding the flu and other illnesses—like washing your hands often and not touching your face—one of the most effective tips that germ-avoiding superstars, AKA teachers, swear by is actually the easiest: Change your clothes once you get home from work. Think of it as a health-sanctioned reason to bust out your comfiest sweats.

Since bacteria and viruses can cling onto your clothes and head home with you after a long day of working, one preschool teacher said she changes right after walking in the door.

Since bacteria and viruses can cling to your clothes and head home with you after a long day in your petri dish of an office, one preschool teacher said she changes right after walking in the door. “In general, doing this is going to decrease the amount of bacteria and viruses you’re exposed to,” infectious disease expert Amesh A. Adalja, MD, told Self.

If you’re interacting with a lot of people on the daily—whether that’s in a school or during your commute on public transportation—swapping germy duds for something fresh and clean could potentially save you from getting sick. Extra bonus: This way, you won’t be sharing your couch with your new bacteria friends during your nightly Netflix binge.

This is what one nutritionist eats when she’s starting to feel sick. Or, find out what you should do with your makeup after coming down with a bug.

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