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Your relationship might seriously benefit from a digital detox, survey results suggest


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Photo: Stocksy/Studio Firma

How much time do you and your partner spend together in silence, individually scrolling through your phones or typing away on your laptops? It’s probably a lot, and you’re definitely not alone.

The healthy-marriage app Lasting recently surveyed 75,000 married couples and found 79 percent of respondents admitted technology distracts them from connecting with each other. On top of that, just 22 percent of lovebirds reported being satisfied with how much intentional “couple time” they spend together, whether that’s scheduling a fun date night, à la Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard, or simply going on a walk.

Of the 75,000 married couples surveyed, 79 percent admitted technology distracts them from connecting with each other. On top of that, just 22 percent reported being satisfied with how much intentional “couple time” they spend together.

It’s super easy to get caught up in the day-to-day and forget just how necessary time together, away from distractions, is for your healthy relationship. That’s exactly why you and your S.O. could seriously benefit from a digital detox. Not only will steering clear of screens give you and your loved one some much-needed alone time, but the exercise also offers some health benefits: Studies have shown less screen time can beget a whole lot more happiness.

But no need to run off an buy your own private island to get away from it all. (Although, that is an option, FYI.) You don’t even need to completely ditch your phone: Just leaving it in the other room for one night a week can lead to more face-to-face quality time that’ll strengthen your relationship.

This start-up rents tiny homes in the woods for the ultimate digital detox. Also, here’s how to go all out with your digital detox.

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