You May Also Like

Avozilla avocados in Australia are 5x larger

Kettlebell-size avocados are here to prove that sometimes, size *totally* matters

These vegan ground-beef tacos are gluten-free

Taco night just got a lot healthier thanks to a surprising gluten-free, vegan meat recipe

Magnesium supplement types

What you need to know before buying a magnesium supplement

girl with eyes closed

13 ways to get rid of under-eye bags and dark circles—without products

This essential oil could be a lifesaver in fighting superbugs

This essential oil can take on superbugs (and it’s probably already in your pantry)

Best beauty products Nordstrom Anniversary sale

Here’s how to shop the Nordstrom Anniversary sale like a beauty editor

Do “night shift” modes on electronics really help you sleep better?


Thumbnail for Do “night shift” modes on electronics really help you sleep better?
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Bonnin Studio

When it comes to tips for better sleep, the advice you’re likely to hear over and over again is to put away the electronics. By now, the words “blue light” are almost synonymous with “good luck falling asleep tonight.” But over time, smart devices have become even smarter. Now, virtually (so to speak) every phone, tablet, and computer has a “night shift” mode, with warmer hues—and no blue light. Problem solved, right?

According to a new study by the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the difference might not be as stark as many have believed. The research found that both light forms affect melatonin the same way. “Basically having the night shift at any mode is not statistically significantly different than not using it,” Mariana Figueiro, director of Rensselaer’s Lighting Research Center and one of the study’s lead researchers tells Fast Company.

“Basically having the night shift at any mode is not statistically significantly different than not using it.” —Mariana Figueiro, a lead researcher on the study

There’s another reason why it might not make a difference: a psychological one. If you were on your phone, tablet, or computer right before hoping to fall asleep, your mind may be preoccupied with whatever it was you were absorbed in—whether it’s work emails, your Facebook feed, or a YouTube video.

But the psychological coin flips the other way too: Figueiro says switching a device to night shift mode can help if you believe it does. If you have it in your mind as “this little habit will help me sleep like a baby wrapped in cashmere swaddling clothes,” then, hey, it just might.

But if you really want to play it safe, you might be better off settling down with a good old-fashioned book—you know, with actual paper pages. And FYI we have some suggestions

The road to better sleep also includes eating these foods pre-bedtime. Plus, five habits a sleep doctor follows for perfect zzz’s every night

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

This essential oil could be a lifesaver in fighting superbugs

This essential oil can take on superbugs (and it’s probably already in your pantry)

Well+Good - These 6 things will *actually* make you happy, according to science

These 6 things will *actually* make you happy, according to science

These vegan ground-beef tacos are gluten-free

Taco night just got a lot healthier thanks to a surprising gluten-free, vegan meat recipe

Best beauty products Nordstrom Anniversary sale

Here’s how to shop the Nordstrom Anniversary sale like a beauty editor

Magnesium supplement types

What you need to know before buying a magnesium supplement

Friday the 13th phobia is a legit health concern

Yep, fearing Friday the 13th is a legit health concern—it has a name and everything