You May Also Like

Man bikes 10,500 miles to see son in Olympics

This dad and stepmom biked through 20 countries to see their Olympic athlete son compete

lorde struggling with acne

Lorde brilliantly debunks some myths about dealing with acne

Do zinc and Echinacea really fight colds?

Are zinc and echinacea *really* a cold-fighting power couple?

Well+Good - Why cellular health needs to be on your radar—and how you can boost it

Why cellular health needs to be on your radar—and how you can boost it

paid sick days

This city just reached a major milestone to try to keep workplaces flu-free

What's it like to meet with a sex therapist?

What is it *actually* like to meet with a sex therapist?

Are Fitbits for babies about to be the new health-tracker trend?


baby and mother Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Treasures Travels

Adults are increasingly connected to tech-y wearables—whether a Fitbit, an Apple Watch, or even a UV-ray tracker—and now, babies are getting in on the digitized, knowledge-rich fun.

But, not to worry, parents: The goal of wearables for babies isn’t to make sure your tike is clocking in 10,000 steps (or crawls or scoots) a day. Rather, worried parents can now keep track of their infant’s stats for a little peace of mind. Dr. Jennifer Shu, a pediatrician at Children’s Medical Group in Atlanta, told CNN there’s something for everyone on the market—from heart-rate–monitoring wristbands to socks that track oxygen levels. There’s even a baby monitor that snaps right onto an infant’s clothing. But are they worth trying?

“If it looks like something that could be safe that you want to try, talk it over with your pediatrician to see if they have any concerns.” —Jennifer Shu, MD

“I recommend parents to follow their common sense,” Dr. Shu said. “If it looks like something that could be safe that you want to try, talk it over with your pediatrician to see if they have any concerns. But if it’s something that looks like it could be uncomfortable or hard to use, you may want to steer away from it.”

Since high-tech wearables are still pretty new in the baby world, they’re also fairly expensive—expect to spend a few hundred dollars for each product. But considering the adult versions aren’t necessarily closeout deals (the new Apple Watch Series 3 is $399), spending a little extra money on something to help your kiddo stay healthy while squelching certain stressors in the process is kind of a no-brainer.

Here’s how the new wave of wearables track mindfulness. Or, maybe give these habit trackers a try.