You May Also Like

beet latte

This rosy-hued oat milk latte is as delicious as it is pretty

Trader Joe's might stock cauliflower gnocchi

Cauliflower connoisseurs: Trader Joe’s might soon answer your low-carb, Italian-cuisine dreams

Chopped romaine lettuce hosts e. coli outbreak

Everything you need to know about the E. coli outbreak on romaine lettuce

steaz prickly pear water

The super fruit that needs to be on your radar (and the best ways to use it)

Corn leads to the most weight gain of any veggie

Here’s why you might want to enjoy this beloved summer vegetable in moderation

Can collagen replace your protein powder?

Can collagen replace your post-workout protein powder?

Can apple cider vinegar help you kick your sugar cravings?


Thumbnail for Can apple cider vinegar help you kick your sugar cravings?
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Nadine Greeff

It’s no wonder tons of celebs and wellness gurus (and pretty much everyone else) have been incorporating apple cider vinegar into their health and beauty routines. From shine-boosting hair treatments to sleep-promoting bedtime elixirs, there are a slew of legitimate uses for the pantry powerhouse (which also keeps your digestion in tip-top shape, proponents say). But it turns out there’s yet another ACV benefit that you might not have considered: It can help to manage sugar cravings.

According to Savorfull founder Stacy Goldberg, RN, MPH there are several indications that ACV can effectively keep a sweet tooth under control. For starters, it contains acetic acid, known for its antimicrobial properties—and more. “The acetic acid component may [also] help prevent high glucose and insulin resistance,” says Goldberg. One study confirmed this to be true, concluding that consuming acetic acid via vinegar with a carb-heavy meal can help regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, which can be very helpful in reducing sugar cravings.

“[Apple cider vinegar] may be a tool to ward off sugar cravings and keep them at bay.” —Savorfull founder Stacy Goldberg

ACV can be super beneficial when it comes to managing your appetite, too. “There is some evidence that shows ingesting vinegar increases short-term satiety, which can aid in weight loss and maintenance when combined with a healthy diet and exercise,” says Goldberg. In other words, taking a shot of ACV with a glass of water at meal times can help you feel more full.

That said, Goldberg recommends taking a few precautions when drinking vinegar on the reg. “Certain medications may have interactions with ACV, so you should consult a physician or pharmacist first,” she says. And if you do decide to add the elixir to your routine, remember that its acidity can be harmful to your teeth, esophagus, and digestive system. “Do not drink it straight,” warns Goldberg. Instead, try mixing one tablespoon with 8 ounces of water or use it as a base for salad dressing.

“This is not a quick fix, but it may be a tool to ward off sugar cravings and keep them at bay,” Goldberg proclaims. Thirty-day sugar detox challenge, accepted.

ACV also makes a great addition to your bar cart. Here’s how to use it in a turmeric Moscow mule and a whisky-kombucha cocktail

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

beet latte

This rosy-hued oat milk latte is as delicious as it is pretty

The Goods Mart convenience store

This better-for-you convenience store serves up healthy versions of pit-stop faves

Chopped romaine lettuce hosts e. coli outbreak

Everything you need to know about the E. coli outbreak on romaine lettuce

Is it bad to eat before a workout?

Does a pre-workout meal help or hinder your fitness goals?

steaz prickly pear water

The super fruit that needs to be on your radar (and the best ways to use it)

How Scarlett Johansson gets in superhero shape

The 4 lifestyle shifts that transform Scarlett Johansson into a superhero