You May Also Like

Well+Good - Make these recipes once, eat gourmet meals all week long

Make these recipes once, eat gourmet meals all week long

8 signs you have a summer cold, not allergies

Summer cold or seasonal allergies? These 8 signs will tell you exactly which one you’re suffering from

dinner

These are the 4 foods a gut doctor would never eat

The best temperature for an office for best work

Brain fog making it hard to work? Blame the heat wave—seriously

The 6-ingredient, gut-friendly salad celeb trainer Tracy Anderson swears by

The 6-ingredient, gut-friendly salad celeb trainer Tracy Anderson swears by

Do you have an a, b, c, d, type personality?

Don’t feel like you have a Type A *or* B personality? Well, C and D also exist

Another reason to buy organic: Pesticides might seep into your produce


Thumbnail for Another reason to buy organic: Pesticides might seep into your produce
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Bonninstudio

If you’re still on the fence about paying up for organic groceries, this might help you make up your mind: Pesticides sprayed on conventional produce doesn’t necessarily just stay on the peel or skin—it might actually seep into the tissue of the fruit and veggies.

Unfortunately, the bad stuff isn’t so easy to wash off after all—but does it affect everything in your cart? Lili He, an assistant professor of food science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, told the The New York Times that foods with a thicker peel—like cantaloupe and avocado—are effective at keeping out the pesticides, but there are plenty of items without a veritable coat of armor.

Vigorous washing and cleaning methods don’t make a huge difference, particularly because the pesticide residue penetrates so deeply into the peel—as in right into the flesh of the fruit and veggies.

While you can scrub your apples and cucumbers all you want, it might be all for naught if they’re already pesticide-laden: In her studies, He found vigorous washing and cleaning methods (even with a baking soda solution!) don’t make a huge difference, particularly because the pesticide residue penetrates so deeply into the peel—as in right into the flesh of the fruit and veggies.

So while organic produce might be a little more expensive, when it comes to your well-being, ponying up a couple extra bucks at the grocery store might be worth it.

Here’s why you should wash your produce with baking soda as opposed to just water. And here are five mistakes even healthy people make while washing their produce.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

The best temperature for an office for best work

Brain fog making it hard to work? Blame the heat wave—seriously

Cleaning hacks for home using newspaper for dust

Never dust your home’s hard-to-reach nooks and crannies again, thanks to this simple hack

Well+Good - Make these recipes once, eat gourmet meals all week long

Make these recipes once, eat gourmet meals all week long

8 signs you have a summer cold, not allergies

Summer cold or seasonal allergies? These 8 signs will tell you exactly which one you’re suffering from

Watermelon margarita

Try This Low-Sugar Watermelon Margarita For Major Vacay Vibes

Well+Good - PepsiCo is on a mission to end healthy food deserts—here's how

PepsiCo is on a mission to end healthy food deserts—here’s how