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3 common lunge mistakes most people make and how to fix them—according to Kayla Itsines


3 most common lunge mistakes Kayla Itsines Pin It
Photo: Instagram/@kayla_itsines

Lunges are a go-to strength-training move for ballerinas, runners, and yogis alike. If your form is on point, they sculpt your thighs and calves (not to mention your glutes). But after a few not-so-aligned reps, your body might be none too pleased with you.

“Many women complain about knee or back aches after doing lunges,” wrote Kayla Itsines—rockstar personal trainer, author, and pull-up queen—on a recent Instagram video, “Lunges should not cause you pain in your knees, back, or shoulders.” In the video, Itsines (pronounced it-seen-us, BTW) breaks down the most common mistakes she sees her clients make and how to correct them for A-plus lunging form.

First up: Itstines says that female lungers are *super* prone to leaning forward as they lower their hips toward the ground mid-lunge. Instead, try keeping your abs tucked in, your spine upright, and your shoulders directly over your hips.

“If you find that you lose balance whilst doing lunges, make sure your feet remain shoulder-width apart (not one foot in front of the other).”

Next, check the width and length of your stance. If your feet are too close together, your front knee will slide way in front of your ankle as you dip down. “If you find that you lose balance whilst doing lunges, make sure you feet remain shoulder-width apart (not one foot in front of the other),” writes Itsines. Last but not least, she reminds her followers that your entire front foot should remain planted throughout the lunge—as in, that heel should not pop up as you lower down.

Now, you can lunge into 2018 with happy knees (and killer calves).

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