You May Also Like

How to make a healthy smoothie? Load up on veggies

The main ingredient in your smoothie actually shouldn’t be fruit, says one all-star dietitian

Transitions Lenses

Newsflash: Transitions lenses now have serious style cred—and wellness benefits

yale happiness class

How to take Yale’s ultra-popular ‘The Science of Well-Being’ course online for zero dollars

Need a reason to spring for a natural-light-rich apartment? Fewer germs—seriously

More natural light in your home means fewer germs—seriously, science says so

USA gymnastics news: women are not being supported

Why can’t Team USA gymnasts (and all female athletes, for that matter) catch a break lately?

Why do men send unsolicited dick pics before a date?

Finally, the psychological reasons men send those unsolicited dick pics

The science-backed reason you should definitely get a dog


Thumbnail for The science-backed reason you should definitely get a dog
Pin It
Photo: Instagram/@ps.ny

Is there any greater feeling than walking through the door after a tough day and being greeted with a giant smile and a million passionate kisses—from your tail-wagging, always-happy-to-see-you pup?

At times, having a dog is all fun and games. Other times, it’s up to your fiercely loyal pooch to remind you to live in the moment, to find joy in every day (or morsel of food), and to resist the urge to hold a grudge.

So yeah, it’s safe to say life with a furry companion is pretty good (minus the potty-training period). And now, new research offers up further evidence that sharing your space with with a nose-boppable “good boy” is also really good for you.

“We were amazed to find that dog walkers were on average more physically active and spent less time sitting on the coldest, wettest, and darkest days than non-dog owners were on long, sunny, and warm days.”

It’s long been known that having a pet can lead to lower stress levels and lower blood pressure, and that dog owners are more active than their non-dog-loving counterparts. (A study last month showed that older dog owners take nearly 3,000 more steps per day than non-dog owners—accounting for an additional 23 minutes of movement per day.)

And a new study in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health says dog owners are significantly more active, particularly in the winter.

The study looked at 3,123 participants between the ages of 49 and 91 and tracked their movements over the course of seven days. The nearly 20 percent of participants who owned a dog were more active for around 30 minutes per day—including during inclement weather. (Puppy still has to go potty, even when it’s sleeting!)

“We were amazed to find that dog walkers were on average more physically active and spent less time sitting on the coldest, wettest, and darkest days than non-dog owners were on long, sunny, and warm days,” says project lead Andy Jones, PhD, a professor at University of East Anglia in the UK, Time reports.

“Dog walking is driven by the needs of the animal. Being driven by something other than our own needs might be a really potent motivator and we need to find ways of tapping into it when designing exercise interventions in the future,” he says. Just consider this yet another reason to adopt a furry friend (who—bonus—can double as a workout buddy).

If you really want to get active with your pup, get your downward dog on with your dog or have an early-morning, canine dance party.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Sex Positive Health Care

Sex-positive healthcare is here to make doctors’ visits comfortable for all

how to make a long candle last longer

The lighting solutions you need to burn every last bit of your cozy fall candles

USA gymnastics news: women are not being supported

Why can’t Team USA gymnasts (and all female athletes, for that matter) catch a break lately?

Why do men send unsolicited dick pics before a date?

Finally, the psychological reasons men send those unsolicited dick pics

The anti-inflammatory ingredient Meghan Markle adds into her banana bread

The anti-inflammatory ingredient Meghan Markle adds to her banana bread

A hip, low-back, and knee pain exercises and modifications guide

So you’ve got knee, hip, or low back pain? Here’s how to modify your workout accordingly