This cozy sweatshirt will make you rethink everything you know about recycled plastic


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Photo: Everlane

Not since Mean Girls has being plastic been such a big deal. At the moment, every socially responsible fashion company seems to be working on ways to literally weave more of the recycled material into its clothing—in order to keep some of the 8 billion tons of plastic currently on the planet out of the oceans. Among them is the modern basics brand Everlane. Today it dropped its first capsule completely devoid of new synthetics.

Fittingly called the ReNew collection, the focus of the line is on what Everlane dubs “outerwear with an outlook.” And its POV is as clear as its radically transparent policies. “Plastic is destroying our planet and there is only one solution—stop creating virgin plastic and renew what’s already here,” said Michael Preysman, Everlane’s founder and CEO, in a recent press release.

Because outwear is primarily made from synthetic textiles, Everlane chose to focus on that category first as part of a bigger plan to switch over entirely to recycled plastic by 2021. It reused 3 million plastic bottles to make the 13 piece capsule of puffer coats, parkas, and fleece pullovers. The collection ranges in price from $55–$198 and a real standout is an ochre (or golden brown) fleece sweatshirt that is the muted fall iteration of this summer’s turmeric yellow trend.

It’s hard to fathom that its fuzzy shell is woven out of water bottles. Yet, right now, in its recycling facility, the San Francisco-based company is turning these discarded drink containers into crystals (not those kinds) which are then spun into yarn used to weave fabric. That basically makes Everlane the Rumplestiltskin of ready to wear. The only difference is that this golden fleece is supporting a good cause.

Sustainability is a major buzzword in fashion right now. Call it the Stella effect, but everyone from H&M to Adidas is becoming more eco-friendly.

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