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3 genius truths from Amy Schumer and Lena Dunham on body positivity—and evil salespeople


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Spreading awesomeness is nothing new for Amy Schumer and Lena Dunham—and as a gift to women everywhere, the two teamed up on Inside Amy Schumer to get real about something almost all of us have experienced: #shoppingshame.

You’d be hard up to find a woman who hasn’t had a horrific shopping experience of some sort that made her leave the store feeling worse about herself instead of better. Maybe it was trying on jeans in a fitting room with the most unflattering mirrors ever. Or literally getting stuck in something. (Ever panic and think, oh my god, I am going to have to buy this and wear it forever?) Even being completely ignored by a salesperson can be enough to ruin a shopping trip.

But people who aren’t a single-digit size often get shopping-shamed the most, which Schumer and Dunham 100 percent capture in the video.

Here are three truths that the duo absolutely nails in the Comedy Central sketch.

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1. Asking for your size should not be embarrassing

Sure, Schumer’s being cheeky with the bit where she asks for a larger size and the saleswoman replies, “Have you checked under the table? Good luck!” But it’s a real thing that happens. Some speciality boutiques even keep only a few size 2s and 4s on the rack so customers have to ask for a bigger size. Finding a size should not require extra effort—or make you feel bad about yourself.

2. Size 2s and 12s should not be pitted against each other

When the saleswoman tells Schumer, “Could you keep your voice down? You’re scaring the thinner customers,” it captures perfectly that experience of walking into a store and thinking, oh my god, I’m not welcome here. Is there an app for silencing the bully in your brain? (And blocking out the one behind the register?)

3. The temptation to just get something—anything—and go is real

So what does Amy end up buying? A giant tarp! While the whole thing is tongue-in-cheek, that feeling of, welp, I guess I’ll just buy this shapeless dress and get out of here, is all too real. But don’t give in to the (sometimes very intense) pressure from the store to get something that’s “perfect for covering your pool, or your problem areas,” as the saleswoman tells Amy. Celebrate your shape—and buy what makes you feel like a badass.

Want more body positivity wisdom? Dunham has been on a roll lately with these five brilliant observations. Then, try these seven positivity practices for skeptics