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Kettlebell-size avocados are here to prove that sometimes, size *totally* matters


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Photo: Stocksy/Jessica Sharmin

Real talk: Avomania is a thing. There’s an all-avocado restaurant, the kitchen market is flooded with single-focus tools for the fruit, it’s a full-on category of home decor, and the image alone makes us so happy that it replaces the role a significant others. All of that adoration clearly went to the superfood’s head, because now a new giant breed—aptly regarded as the “avozilla”—is taking over in Australia.

A combination of the West Indian and Guatemalan avocado breeds, the super-size fruit is five times larger than your typical variety, reports CNN. In fact, the largest avozilla plucked from the trees so far has been 1.8 kilograms (almost four pounds!), AKA the size of a small kettlebell. Each retails for $8, but unsurprisingly, the enormous, nutrient-dense fruits are selling like, well, avocadosThey’ve yet to even make it to the bins at Aussie grocery stores because the demand is so high that they’re snatched up practically straight from the vine (although they’re reportedly for sale at specialty stores in a few major cities).

The enormous surface area of the enhanced breed does not detract from its well-loved flavor, according to David Groves, the avozilla farmer in Queensland. “I’m pleased to say they’re just as buttery as a Shepard or a Hass.”

Though the crop is native to South Africa, a farming family in Queensland recently brought 400 trees’ worth of the extra-large fruit to the Land Down Under. Another farmer in Bundaberg just planted 2,000 more trees to get a slice of what’s clearly an incredibly lucrative business.

The enormous surface area of the enhanced breed does not detract from its well-loved flavor, according to David Groves, the avozilla farmer in Queensland. “I’m pleased to say they’re just as buttery as a Shepard or a Hass,” he says. (Although, if you are in the market for a sweeter version of the brunch staple, its Peruvian doppelgänger, lucuma, might be more your speed.)

As for us non-Aussies, we’ll just have to patiently await the day these trees migrate to all corners of the globe. In the meantime, we’re gonna to need to find some bigger toast.

This is how Costco is making your avocados last twice as long. Plus, here’s how you can replicate the green superfood Starbucks frappé that’s all the rage in South Korea.

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