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Brooke Shields credits these workout moves for changing and restoring her body


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Photo: Instagram/@brookeshields

Brooke Shields is literal proof that, like a fine natural wine, women just get better with time: At age 52, her eyebrows are #beautygoals and her complexion is positively glowing. But she doesn’t credit her brow shaper for transforming her entire body (duh). Rather, Shields attributes her healthy physique to her workout routine, which includes Pilates, SoulCycle, and a certain two moves that are simultaneously restorative and strengthening, according to Health.

“I’ve just started hanging upside down in inversion boots, doing hamstring pulls and sit-ups. I’m amazed at how great it feels on my back.” —Brooke Shields

Although she spent earlier years of her career getting in good sweat sessions as a Broadway dancer and as a recreational runner, Shields weathered several injuries and a lot of exhaustion. And no matter how many Pilates hundreds she does or hours clipped in she spends, the performer credits some extra equipment and two classic moves with changing and restoring her entire body.

“I’ve just started hanging upside down in inversion boots, doing hamstring pulls and sit-ups,” Shields told Health. I’m amazed at how great it feels on my back. I’ll just hang there and then start doing a whole series of crunches and things like that. It’s really hard, but it’s really great, and I notice a difference.”

While inversion boots can be great for your back, you might want to clear using them with your doc before reaping the benefits of hanging upside down, as the practice can reportedly be harmful for folks who have certain health conditions, like heart disease. Also, maybe stay on the ground, feet-first, during your period (here’s why).

Find your favorite workout with these two tips from Rashida Jones, or steal Busy Phillipps’ butt-sculpting move that’ll target your hips, too.

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