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3 simple ways to turn your home into a sanctuary that is truly restorative


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The last thing you want while you’re belting out your favorite Beyoncé songs in the shower without a care in the world is for someone to walk in. Not just because it might be a tiny bit embarrassing—but also because there’s a sense of safety in your personal space, and having that is really important as a woman.

Self-care guru and Well+Good Council member Latham Thomas is all about the power of the physical space and creating an environment that not only makes you feel good, but meets your needs, too.

“The basic needs for women—that are primal needs—are the feeling of safety, security, and a sense of being unobserved,” the Mama Glow founder said during a panel at the WELL Summit in New York City. “For you to have those ‘a-ha’ moments and those moments that give you a sense of freedom when you’re having a moment with yourself and you’re being with yourself, you have to be able to feel senses of safety, security, and not being observed.”

So how do you design a space that reflects that for you? According to Thomas, it has a lot to do with the atmosphere and mood of your home—and all it takes is a handful of simple changes.

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1. Make your home cozier

According to Thomas, making your space meet your primal needs can simply start with upping the hygge level. Swap your bedspread and pillow shams for something more comfortable, and get a cozy blanket for the living room. The goal is feeling completely at ease when you’re lying under your covers at night or watching your favorite show on Netflix.

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2. Buy some fresh flowers and light some candles

Having fresh blooms sitting in a vase in your apartment just makes you feel really good, right? And the same goes for that moment you light a candle. Sure, they’re not necessities—but they’re certainly good for the soul. Bringing them into your home will not only make it smell amazing but will also boost your mood and unleash all sorts of positive vibes.

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3. Play some of your favorite music

When you play good music in your space, it completely takes it over. Make your home feel as soothing as possible by putting your go-to vinyl on the record player, then sit back, relax, and enjoy all the powerful “a-ha” moments to come.

Use one of these salt lamps to give your home a warm (and possibly healthy) glow. Also, these 13 sweaters will keep your cozy office vibes strong.

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